Funding to Support Learning - ɫֱapp

ɫֱapp

Funding to Support Learning

Literacy and Numeracy Support

Literacy and Numeracy support in Lower School

Students who arrive at County in Yr 7 with a number of standardised scores for 84 or below will be will be placed onto a catch-up literacy programme.  These sessions will take place during Tutor Times so students do not have a narrower curriculum.  Students will be regularly assessed and may return to tutor later in Year 7 if they make sufficient progress.  Some students will occasionally come out of lessons for additional support but this is kept to a minimum and decided upon in a case by case basis.

Literacy and Numeracy support in Upper School

For those students who are on an alternative options pathway as a result of their learning needs, an ASDAN qualification is offered.  Each case is assessed on a child-by-child basis.  For other children, literacy and numeracy support will be delivered through a programme offered by Marshall and through the English and Maths Departments. 

Literacy is at the heart of all teaching and learning at GCS. Our students are highly articulate and they are encouraged to express their views, both spoken and written, in a wide variety of curriculum contexts. Every lesson/sequence of lessons provides the students with a multitude of opportunities for demonstrating their literacy skills in a range of ways. These ways fall under the following five broad categories:

Listening Skills – all of the teaching is centred around the use of discussion; thus it is vital that students and teachers become active and careful listeners. The difference between hearing and listening is key to this; students are taught from the start of their time at GCS that they improve their learning by responding to and developing upon the ideas of others. Teachers encourage the use of ‘hands down’, especially in the early stages of discussions, to ensure that students have to listen to their peers and their contributions should be in the form of a response to what has been said before. The teacher takes the role of chairing the discussion, intervening only to refocus and address misconceptions.

Oracy – students are provided with numerous opportunities to speak and it is an expectation that all students should respond. The role of the teacher is to plan the discussion in such a way that students feel comfortable making contributions. Although the majority of students at GCS are confident and articulate, it is important that the less vocal students are provided with a safe and supportive environment in order to overcome their reticence. The relationships between students and teachers are fostered to allow this to happen.

Reading Skills – In an increasingly media obsessed age, we must all recognise the wide diversity of potential texts that students may be exposed to; thus teachers seek to embrace and utilise technology rather than ban it from our classrooms. It is also relevant in a school where such high regard is given to the creative element of learning, that we should recognise that reading is not confined to the written word and that students are given opportunities to read other texts such as media, music and art.

Writing Skills – writing is part of a process, only to be attempted once the previous three stages have been completed. Students discuss and evaluate real life examples of work before attempting their own. Ideas and concepts are explored verbally before they are committed to paper (or computer screen). Editing and improving is a further stage of this process and students are given opportunities to peer and self assess in order to improve their own work. Again, the atmosphere which allows them to feel comfortable with this process can only come from the teacher.

Subject Specific Language – accurate and coherent literacy skills must employ appropriate terminology and language. Teachers use subject specific vocabulary to all students and encourage them to use it in their discussions and written work. Additionally, appropriate register and tone for specific tasks are determined and utilised.

By seeing literacy as a series of linked activities, rather than a single discrete entity, teachers aim to encourage all our students to become active and critical self learners; to be curious and enquiring; to develop the skills of analysis, synthesis and review which prepares them for the world beyond education and to see real and practical links between subject areas.

Pupil Premium

Summary Pupil Premium Statement 2021/22 

In 2021/22, the school received £119 445 in PP funding and covid recovery money, and is budged to spend an additional £52 000 of its general funds to continue the initiatives of 2021/22, (HSLW x 2, Matrix, Wey Valley support, Pupil Premium support fund) which saw the addition of extended breakfast club provision, support for our 20% plan, further staff CPD focus, and to develop and improve our provision of 1:1 teaching sessions in English and Maths.  We look to implement an extended school for some students which will also need supporting from this budget, and the staff PP Champions Team, whilst incurring no extra costs in itself, may generate further spend as new initiatives are identified moving forward.

In the academic year of 2021/22 we had disjointed periods of in and out of school due to the second lockdown and the impact of covid on our bubbles. Part of the period 2021/22 therefore was in school and part was during this lockdown period and the detail below refers to the support during both. We will be feeling the impacts of covid and lockdown for some considerable time to come and our support of all students, but arguably PP students more, will need to reflect this.  

The list below is extensive, though not exhaustive, providing a summary of our PP work: Please note many of these items rely on Teacher/Coordinator time, and as such dedicated roles are quantifiable, whereas others are less financially definable. There is more detail in the PP strategy document (link below). This, and the documentation required by the Department of Education, will be updated by 31/12/22.

 

  1. Returning to School following Lockdown 2 release
  • Our immediate priority on returning to school after lockdown 2 was to rebuild a welcoming environment that allowed us to forge broken relationships again and build back confidence and trust levels with all our vulnerable learners.

  Expenditure in 2021/22: Financially unquantifiable, in terms of hours, invaluable.

  1. Enhancing reading, writing and mathematics skills for PP students
  • Small group teaching and designated SEN teacher.
  • During lockdown each member of the SEN department was allocated a group of students to identify the needs of and report back. Either physical resources were prepared or online lessons completed depending on the environment.

Expenditure in 2021/22: £68 530

  1. Using extra-curricular provision to engage students and develop a depth of learning
  • Provision of Music Tuition and accessibility to all school trips.
  • Where practical, we continued online tuition of Music.
  • This spend will likely increase in the future as more trips are arranged following the release of covid restrictions. An example of this is the French exchange trip (in 2023).

Expenditure in 2021/22: £11 640

  1.  Ensuring staff have a clear focus on the potential impact of disadvantage and the need to improve student outcomes:
  • 4 matrix training, PP coordinator at SLT level, LAC coordinator, learning and teaching CPL sessions, Department driven initiatives.
  • We established a food drop network for all our PP families, which ran for the duration of lockdown weekly. Voluntary food donations were supplemented with purchase of food from suppliers and supermarkets. Run a voluntary basis, teaching and support staff ensured continuity of provision to every family.

Expenditure in 2021/22: £19 410

  1.  Engage PP students with school life, encouraging them to be happy, enthused and recognising their potential:
  • Ensuring access to all school events, TA time targeting PP, HSLW, Youth Worker, Summer school, Surrey CC support services, subsided tickets, PP mentors, school uniform, free breakfasts

Expenditure in 2021/22: £22 950

  1.  Addressing specific issues that impact the performance of individual students:
  • Purchase of revision aids and equipment.
  • During Lockdown 2, we provided transport to and from our hub FSM allocated school for several families, and contributed to the extra expense incurred by our hub school in providing this service.
  • We engaged in the Governments IT laptop scheme for vulnerable children, and supplemented this with our own hardware.

Expenditure in 2021/22: £15 120

For the academic year 2022-23 we have 133 PP students in school

Pupil Premium Strategy 2020-23

Pupil Premium, DfE strategy document

News

24th August 2023

ɫֱapp Results 2023

We are really pleased with today’s news of some great results at ɫֱapp.  Results that will open many doors for the students and results that buck the national trend this year of grade deflation.  These results are amongst the best that the school has seen at ɫֱapp level and are so as a result of the hard work and dedication of the staff team and also as a result of the work ethic shown by so very many of the children themselves.  Results distribution today went smoothly as a result of the work of the Exams and Sixth Form teams, but we must also thank the many other staff who attended earlier on this morning in order to help with the distribution of results and to offer their congratulations and support to the students themselves.  This is not an obligation by any means, but it is hugely warming when colleagues choose to give up some of their holiday time so as to see the children through to the next stage of their life journeys. Whilst much of the early part of our outgoing Year 11s’ secondary school studies were mired by the pandemic, it has been wonderful to watch them grow and develop into such wonderful young adults.  We look forward, next, to the national level data analysis that will enable us to accurately assess the amount of progress that each child has made and that we have made as a whole school.  That said, with attainment a useful proxy for progress we feel quietly confident that we have performed well as a school at ɫֱapp level. Over the five year story that we have jointly told together, each and every student is now able to take forward something that they can feel incredibly proud of and I am delighted to be able to share with you some individual stories of success. With 40% of all grades awarded at 9-7, it is difficult to single out individual students.  Deserving of a special mention, though, are Shiv, Jasmin, Erin, Koby, Isobel, Joseph, Amelia, Bishesta, Rose, Evie, Emma, Veronica, Jack and Rebecca for achieving exceptionally high results.  We are especially proud also of Freya, Daisy and Ethan for achieving 10 or more ɫֱapps at grade 9 – a fantastic achievement.  In total, 30 students achieved on average 2 grades or higher than expected – Hannah, Rose, Madeleine and Freddie achieved well above their target grades – a massive well done to them.  Today represents the end of one phase of each student's education and is a terrific opportunity to recognise and celebrate what they have all achieved. We are delighted to be able to congratulate the Year 11 Class of 2023 for their fantastic results and also to wish them well as they move on to the next phase of their lives with our full support and our very best wishes for the future. For many, I am thrilled to say that this will be here at Guildford County Sixth Form and we cannot wait to welcome them and a large number of external recruits through the doors in September. Please see below some headline data for your interest.   2017/2018 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 2021/2022 2022/2023   # % # % # % # % # % # % EM5+ 103 67.32 100 62.5 98 62.82 112 68.71 123 68.33 119 66 EM4+ 122 79.74 131 81.88 135 86.54 132 80.98 152 84.44 145 80 E5+ 121 79.08 123 76.88 123 78.85 125 76.69 145 80.56 132 73 M5+ 106 69.28 107 66.88 107 68.59 120 73.62 129 71.67 136 75 S5+ 101 66.01 99 61.88 109 69.87 123 75.46 120 66.67 122 67 Grade 9 to 8 (Inc A*) 403 26.72 285 19.09 365 25.03 427 27.35 409 24.91 402 24 Grade 9 to 7 (Inc A*-A) 631 41.84 507 33.96 621 42.59 674 43.18 677 41.23 648 39.34 Grade 9 to 5 (Inc A*-B) 1057 70.09 1039 69.59 1128 77.37 1122 71.88 1244 75.76 1180 72 Grade 9 to 5 (Inc A*-C) 1112 73.74 1039 69.59 1128 77.37 1122 71.88 1244 75.76 1180 72 Grade 9 to 4 (Inc A*-C) 1240 82.23 1246 83.46 1309 89.78 1299 83.22 1430 87.09 1364 83 Progress 8 0.56 0.37 0.66 0.68 0.51 +0.43 (subject to autumn confirmation) Attainment 8 59.15 57.06 60.45 59.73 60.48 58.17 Total grades 1508 1493 1458 1561 1642 1644   This coming year, we will once again work on our genuinely held ambition to be leaders in secondary education and we will have a laser sharp focus on literacy, on leadership and on learning; delivering all of this with the love that sets us apart from many in our field and delivering it by working now on the marginal gains that will make all the difference and that will give rise to truly effective learning experiences for every single child. Read Full Article
17th August 2023

A Level Results 2023

Today we are celebrating the hard work and multiple successes of our Sixth Form students here at ɫֱapp. Our sincere thanks go to the Sixth Form and Exams teams for making sure that the preparation for today and the results distribution morning itself ran so smoothly and also to the many other staff who attended earlier on in order to help with the delivery of results and to offer their congratulations and support to the students. We are pleased that the build up to and delivery of the summer examinations season felt once again this year as we would hope, as we continue to emerge from the pandemic.  It has also been interesting this week to read the commentary from experts in response to Ofqual’s move to return to a grading regime similar to that seen in 2019. With the politics of education put to one side, then, I am really keen for us all at County to choose to look today at the personal stories of the individual students for whom this occassion represents the culmination of this chapter in their educational journeys.  We should once again adopt the narrative of resilient learners, dedicating themselves to their studies under the leadership of exceptional colleagues from across the school – teachers, support staff and governors alike.  These are students who have worked tirelessly over a great number of years and they are now able to move on to the next stage in their education with the sense of achievement and recognition that they so richly deserve.  Before we look at the results of the cohort as a whole, I am delighted to be able to share with you some individual stories of success. Individual successes were many in a range of subject areas.  We are particularly proud of several outstanding results from these high performing students.  Joseph (A*, A*, A*, A), Eleanor (A*, A*, A*, B), Hannah (A*, A*, A*), Max (A*, A*, A*) and Daisy (A*, A*, A*). At the time of writing, 72% of all of our departing students have secured places at Universities from Aberystwyth to Edinburgh to Plymouth with 44% of those students going to university accepting places at prestigious Russell Group universities.  Three County students who held Oxbridge offers have been successful.  Joe has secured a place at Cambridge to read Engineering.  Josh is going to Oxford to read Philosophy, Politics and Economics and Isabelle has secured a place at Cambridge to study Modern and Medieval Languages.  As a Music Specialist College, we are also thrilled to celebrate with Jim as he accepts a place at the Royal Academy of Music conservatoire.  We also congratulate Thuan for securing a place at the University of the Arts of London, at the Jimmy Choo Academy. Today represents the end of one phase of each student's education and the opportunity to recognise and celebrate what they have achieved. We are delighted to be able to congratulate the Sixth Form Class of 2023 for their many achievements and also to wish them well as they move on to the next phase of their lives with our full support and our very best wishes for the future. I am hopeful that many will choose to become members of our ever growing alumni community and that we will then be able to continue to watch their successes over the years to come. Please see below some headline data for your interest. A Level Grades % A*/A 27 A*/B 52 A*/C 73 A*/D 91 A*/E 97      Read Full Article
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